All posts by Sandy Oliver

Sandy Oliver

About Sandy Oliver

Sandy Oliver Sandy is a freelance food writer with the column Taste Buds appearing weekly since 2006 in the Bangor Daily News, and regular columns in Maine Boats, Homes, and Harbors magazine and The Working Waterfront. Besides freelance food writing, she is a pioneering food historian beginning her work in 1971 at Mystic Seaport Museum, where she developed a fireplace cooking program in an 1830s house. After moving to Maine in 1988, Sandy wrote, Saltwater Foodways: New Englanders and Their Foods at Sea and Ashore in the 19th Century published in 1995. She is the author of The Food of Colonial and Federal America published in fall of 2005, and Giving Thanks: Thanksgiving History and Recipes from Pilgrims to Pumpkin Pie which she co-authored with Kathleen Curtin. She often speaks to historical organizations and food professional groups around the country, organizes historical dinners, and conducts classes and workshops in food history and in sustainable gardening and cooking. Sandy lives on Islesboro, an island in Penobscot where she gardens, preserves, cooks and teaches sustainable lifeways.

Buttermilk Cake Hides Butternut Squash

Over the past few months we have featured a few recipes which have vegetables showing up in odd places. There is the Deep Dark Chocolate Zucchini Cake which nearly everyone I make it for absolutely adores; shaved, raw winter squash salad, Beet Chocolate Cake, and Beet Sorbet. A while back I asked for other recipes […]

“S”-sential Maple Syrup Salad Dressing

March is prime maple-syrup making time. This past Sunday was the annual 2017 Maine Maple Syrup Sunday observed with open-sugarhouses, samples, demonstrations of making maple syrup, and sugar-bush tours. And even though Vermont’s middle name is Maple Syrup, still Maine produces quite a lot of syrup and maple sugar products and this year eighty-five! sugaring […]

Creamy Pumpkin (or Squash) Pasta

Cooked pumpkin on pasta? Excuse me? This is not your grandmother’s pasta dish. I am so old that my Swedish-born grandmother was one of the spaghetti eating pioneers of the late 1920s, early ‘30s. In Depression-era Waterbury, Connecticut, my grandparents’ Italian neighbors ate spaghetti with tomato sauce on it. Gram asked her neighbor for the […]

Sunday Dinner in One Pan

  Does anyone still cook  Sunday dinner? A kind of old-fashioned, main meal of the day with roast, potatoes, side vegetables and dessert that everyone sits down to around noon or 1:00 p.m.? Maybe you know that in the 1700 and 1800s most people ate their main meal around mid-day; easily done by farm families, […]